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DICON/DASON Symposium 2019
November 7-8, 2019
Raleigh Convention Center
Downtown Raleigh, NC
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CDC AMR Challenge

The U.S. government’s Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) Challenge is a yearlong effort to accelerate the fight against antimicrobial resistance across the globe that launched at the United Nations General Assembly in September 2018. 

Read more about our contribution here

A Center of Excellence

One of only two academic sites nationwide to be recognized by the Infectious Diseases Society of America as a Center of Excellence for Antimicrobial Stewardship

eDICON and eDASON

Practical, ready-to-use educational tools for your stewardship and infection prevention needs. Anytime, anywhere.

 Learn More:  eDICON    eDASON

DCASIP Programs and Services

The Center’s efforts to improve, explore, educate, and discover strategies to make healthcare safer is made possible through the Center’s four arms of education, consulting, Duke Hospital services, and research.
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We Are Antimicrobial Stewards

We work to prevent antimicrobial resistant infections within the Duke Health system, in community hospitals across the country, and throughout the world through education, research, and consulting. 

Center News

Total duration of antimicrobial therapy resulting from inpatient hospitalization

On May 28, 2019 a paper that DASON staff, DCASIP faculty, and Duke Health Pharmacy staff have been working on was published in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology. The purpose of this work was to assess the feasibility of electronic data capture of post discharge durations and evaluate total durations of anyimicrobial exposure related to inpatient hospital stays. 

To read the full publication, click here

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Antibiotic-resistant bacteria on personal devices in hospital intensive care units: Molecular approaches to quantifying and describing changes in the bacterial community of personal mobile devices

Bacterial community composition and presence of antibiotic resistance genes (mecA, tetK, and vanA) on personal mobile devices (PMDs) of nurses in intensive care units (ICUs) were evaluated. Antibiotic resistance genes on PMDs decreased at the end of the shift, and a several microbial genera changed.

DICON physician, Dr. Deverick Anderson, worked with the ICU staff at Duke University Medical Center. Recruitment of 32 total volunteers was performed at a surgical ICU (SICU) and a medical ICU (MICU). In total, 31 volunteers completed the study.

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Hospital epidemiologists' and infection preventionists' opinions regarding hospital-onset bacteremia and fungemia as a potential healthcare-associated infection metric

Published in the April 2019 edition of Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, this article aims to ascertain opinions regarding etiology and preventability of hospital-onset bacteremia and fungemia (HOB) and perspectives on HOB as a potential outcome measure reflecting quality of infection prevention and hospital care. Participants in this cross-sectional survey are hospital epidemiologists and infection preventionist members of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) Research Network.

Full Article

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Clinical Trial Testing Fecal Microbiota Transplant for Recurrent Diarrheal Disease Begins

A research consortium recently began enrolling patients in a clinical trial examining whether fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) by enema—putting stool from a healthy donor in the colon of a recipient—is safe and can prevent recurrent Clostridium difficile-associated disease (CDAD), a potentially life-threatening diarrheal illness. Investigators aim to enroll 162 volunteer participants 18 years or older who have had two or more episodes of CDAD within the previous six months. 

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Antimicrobial resistance is a major challenge for modern healthcare.  The Duke Center for Antimicrobial Stewardship and Infection Prevention includes a unique portfolio of programs to fight this growing problem. We at CDC look forward to continuing our collaborations with Duke to help protect patients.

—Arjun Srinivasan, MD, FSHEA (CAPT, USPHS), Associate Director for Healthcare Associated Infection Prevention Programs, Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Dr Anderson and colleagues in the Duke Center for Antimicrobial Stewardship and Infection Prevention are world leaders in the important and essential fight to prevent infections and antimicrobial resistance. They are truly providing the 'guiding lights' and leadership  for all to follow in this mission.

—John Perfect, MD, Chief, Division of Infectious Diseases at Duke University School of Medicine

The Duke Center for Antimicrobial Stewardship and Infection Prevention is an important source for education and programmatic support for hospitals in the Southeastern US.  In addition, their research on the epidemiology of multidrug-resistant pathogens and enhancing antibiotic stewardship is of high quality and public health value.  I look forward to collaborating with Dr. Anderson and his expert colleagues for years to come.

—David Weber, MD, MPH, Medical Director of UNC Hospitals' Departments of Hospital Epidemiology and Occupational Health Service, Associate Chief Medical Officer of UNC Health Care